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Financial Resolutions Omaha NE

Money worries in Omaha are the most common cause of holiday stress, according to Mental Health America. The 2006 study showed that parents are more stressed than all other demographic groups by finances and females are more likely than men to feel stressed by finances.

Michael Karstens
Karstens Investment Counsel, Inc.
(402) 492-2727
10250 Regency Circle, Suite 100
Omaha, NE
Expertises
Advising Medical Professionals, Estate & Generational Planning Issues, Ongoing Investment Management, Retirement Planning & Distribution Rules, Retirement Plan Investment Advice
Certifications
NAPFA Registered Financial Advisor, AIFA, BS, CFP®

Keith Smith
K.P. Smith Asset Management
(402) 392-0509
9910 N. 48th Street Suite 112
Omaha, NE
Expertises
Ongoing Investment Management, Retirement Plan Investment Advice, Estate & Generational Planning Issues, College/Education Planning
Certifications
NAPFA Registered Financial Advisor, CFP®, PhD

Ms. Barbara J. Fajen, CFP®
(402) 330-2660
8807 Indian Hills Dr
Omaha, NE
Firm
Seim Johnson Sestak & Quist LL
Areas of Specialization
Accounting, General Financial Planning, Investment Management, Planning for Couples, Retirement Income Management, Retirement Planning, Small Business Planning

Data Provided by:
Mr. Scott T Cavey, CFP®
(402) 393-5900
9290 W Dodge Rd Ste 200
Omaha, NE
Firm
Illuminate Financial Group
Areas of Specialization
Asset Allocation, Business Succession Planning, Comprehensive Financial Planning, Education Planning, Employee and Employer Plan Benefits, General Financial Planning, Insurance Planning
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $1,000,001 - $5,000,000



Data Provided by:
Mr. Michael D. Karstens, CFP®
(402) 492-2727
10250 Regency Circle
Omaha, NE
Firm
Karstens Investment Counsel, Inc.

Data Provided by:
Jason Hiley
Karstens Investment Counsel, Inc.
(402) 492-2727
10250 Regency Circle, Suite 100
Omaha, NE
Expertises
Women's Financial Planning Issues, Advising Medical Professionals, College/Education Planning, Estate & Generational Planning Issues, Helping Clients Identify & Achieve Goals, Ongoing Investment Management
Certifications
NAPFA Registered Financial Advisor, CFP®

Mr. Gabriel Kerlik, CFP®
(402) 334-7265
1111 N 102nd Ct Ste 320
Omaha, NE
Firm
Ameriprise Financial Services,
Areas of Specialization
Comprehensive Financial Planning, Wealth Management
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $100,001 - $250,000

Average Income: $50,001 - $100,000

Profession: Not Applicable

Data Provided by:
Mr. Michael L Schudel, CFP®
(402) 499-5921
9300 Underwood Ave Ste 500
Omaha, NE
Firm
Northwestern Mutual
Areas of Specialization
Asset Allocation, Business Succession Planning, Charitable Giving, Comprehensive Financial Planning, Debt Management, Education Planning, Elder Care
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $250,001 - $500,000

Average Income: $100,001 - $250,000

Profession: Not Applicable

Data Provided by:
Mr. John T. Clark, CFP®
(402) 390-8264
9300 Underwood Ave Ste 500
Omaha, NE
Firm
Northwestern Mutual Financial Network
Areas of Specialization
Comprehensive Financial Planning

Data Provided by:
Mr. Jason L Christo, CFP®
(402) 970-1533
10050 Regency Circle
Omaha, NE
Firm
MetLife
Areas of Specialization
Retirement Income Management

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Financial Resolutions

Money worries are the most common cause of holiday stress, according to Mental Health America. The 2006 study showed that parents are more stressed than all other demographic groups by finances and females are more likely than men to feel stressed by finances.

Money isn’t everyone’s No. 1 worry, but if it’s yours, why not consider the following New Year’s resolutions to improve your financial life?

Resolve:

1. To write down your goals: Have you ever written down the big things you want in life? Granted, all great dreams don’t cost money, but many of them do. Money buys freedom – to travel, to retire early, to start a business, to change careers. Putting goals in writing gives them a formality and a starting point for the planning you must do.

2. To evaluate your risk tolerance: One of the most beneficial things financial planners do is help you articulate your financial goals and establish (or re-establish) your tolerance for risk. With the market turbulence that’s marked 2008, many individuals would benefit from an analysis of how much risk they want – or need – to take given what they want to achieve with their money.

3. To track your spending: If you haven’t purchased financial accounting software or set up a reliable accounting method of your own, this is the year to do it. Diligent expense tracking is the first critical step to getting personal finances in order.

4. To consider advice on taxes and planning: Maybe you’ve always winged it with your taxes and considered your company 401(k) the ticket to your financial future. Chances are your planning is inadequate. Start getting references on good tax professionals and consider sitting down with a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professional to discuss your current retirement savings picture and what you can do to improve it.

5. To cut your credit card debt: If you can’t ever seem to get yourself completely out of credit card debt, make this the year to do it. Take inventory of your balances, figure out if you can consolidate them under your lowest-rate card, and resolve to pay off an amount that exceeds the minimum – on time, every month. Oh, and pay cash from now on.

6. To save: If you haven’t signed up for your employer’s 401(k) plan or begun a savings plan tailored for the self-employed, this is the year. And resolve to save at least 5-10 percent of your take-home pay based on your cash flow, and place the maximum in whatever retirement savings plans you qualify for.

7. Get ahead on your mortgage: This advice isn’t for everybody, but if you’ve paid off your credit cards by paying more than the minimum, you can apply the same principle to your mortgage payment. Every dollar you prepay will potentially save thousands in interest over the life of the loan if you plan to stay in your home long-term. In fact, if you make one extra payment a year, either at once or in equal monthly shares over the course of a year, you can cut at least five years of payments on a 30-year loan. Just don’t short your retirement investment plans to accomplish this.

8. Invest in yourself: If going back to college or taking specific coursework will help you advance in your career, plan to do it. If investing in a health club membership that you actually makes sense for your health as well as your insurance costs, do it.

9. To redefine the way you shop: If you’re an impulse shopper, break the habit in ’09. As a suggestion, get a legal pad and make that your centralized shopping list – use a single page for groceries, stock-up goods (it’s wise to start buying essentials in bulk if you can measure the savings), essential clothing or big expenditures you’ll need to make at specific times. Taking that pad with you wherever you spend money is a good way to keep a grip on your wallet as long as you don’t stray from the list.

10. To attack that miscellaneous column: Do you really need deluxe cable? How much are you paying for your Internet service? Can you wear a sweater around the house and lower the thermostat? In every budget, there are items that can be cut – or at least trimmed. Take a hard look at all your “essentials” to see how essential they really are. Aim for a target of at least 10 percent and start setting that money aside on a regular basis.

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