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Important Money Decisions Omaha NE

Review your risk tolerance in Omaha: Hopefully you have an investment plan, but that doesn’t mean you should let it sit for years without revisiting it. You should review your risk tolerance you’re your financial advisor and be sure your portfolio is allocated properly. Many portfolios have gone out of balance due to the large drop in equity values over the last 18 months.

Michael Karstens
Karstens Investment Counsel, Inc.
(402) 492-2727
10250 Regency Circle, Suite 100
Omaha, NE
Expertises
Advising Medical Professionals, Estate & Generational Planning Issues, Ongoing Investment Management, Retirement Planning & Distribution Rules, Retirement Plan Investment Advice
Certifications
NAPFA Registered Financial Advisor, AIFA, BS, CFP®

Keith Smith
K.P. Smith Asset Management
(402) 392-0509
9910 N. 48th Street Suite 112
Omaha, NE
Expertises
Ongoing Investment Management, Retirement Plan Investment Advice, Estate & Generational Planning Issues, College/Education Planning
Certifications
NAPFA Registered Financial Advisor, CFP®, PhD

Mr. Thomas M. Anderson, CFP®
(800) 559-0683
619 N 90th St
Omaha, NE
Firm
Securities America, Inc.
Areas of Specialization
Asset Allocation, Comprehensive Financial Planning, Education Planning, Employee and Employer Plan Benefits, Estate Planning, Investment Management, Investment Planning
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $500,001 - $1,000,000

Average Income: $50,001 - $100,000

Profession: Not Applicable

Data Provided by:
Mr. John T. Clark, CFP®
(402) 390-8264
9300 Underwood Ave Ste 500
Omaha, NE
Firm
Northwestern Mutual Financial Network
Areas of Specialization
Comprehensive Financial Planning

Data Provided by:
Mr. Steve R Sadler, CFP®
(402) 334-7265
1111 N 102nd Ct Ste 320
Omaha, NE
Firm
Ameriprise Financial Services,
Areas of Specialization
Asset Allocation, Comprehensive Financial Planning, Estate Planning, Insurance Planning, Investment Management, Retirement Income Management
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $500,001 - $1,000,000

Average Income: $100,001 - $250,000

Profession: Business Executives

Data Provided by:
Jason Hiley
Karstens Investment Counsel, Inc.
(402) 492-2727
10250 Regency Circle, Suite 100
Omaha, NE
Expertises
Women's Financial Planning Issues, Advising Medical Professionals, College/Education Planning, Estate & Generational Planning Issues, Helping Clients Identify & Achieve Goals, Ongoing Investment Management
Certifications
NAPFA Registered Financial Advisor, CFP®

Mr. Mark A. Schneider, CFP®
(402) 343-2886
725 N 98th St
Omaha, NE
Firm
Charles Schwab & Co., Inc.
Areas of Specialization
Investment Management
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: Not Applicable

Average Income: Not Applicable

Profession: Not Applicable

Data Provided by:
Mr. Randall L. Jensen, CFP®
(402) 391-0222
9850 Nicholas St.
Omaha, NE
Firm
Nabity-Jensen Investment Management, Inc.

Data Provided by:
Mr. Joseph E Elsasser, CFP®
(402) 343-3654
8420 W Dodge Rd
Omaha, NE
Areas of Specialization
Comprehensive Financial Planning, Insurance Planning, Investment Management, Investment Planning, Life Transitions, Planning for Couples, Retirement Income Management
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $250,001 - $500,000

Average Income: $100,001 - $250,000

Profession: Not Applicable

Data Provided by:
Mr. Michael L Schudel, CFP®
(402) 499-5921
9300 Underwood Ave Ste 500
Omaha, NE
Firm
Northwestern Mutual
Areas of Specialization
Asset Allocation, Business Succession Planning, Charitable Giving, Comprehensive Financial Planning, Debt Management, Education Planning, Elder Care
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $250,001 - $500,000

Average Income: $100,001 - $250,000

Profession: Not Applicable

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Important Money Decisions

After historic volatility in 2008 the current investment environment will continue to be strewn with potential challenges. Here are some important things to consider going forward:

1) Review your risk tolerance: Hopefully you have an investment plan, but that doesn’t mean you should let it sit for years without revisiting it. You should review your risk tolerance you’re your financial advisor and be sure your portfolio is allocated properly. Many portfolios have gone out of balance due to the large drop in equity values over the last 18 months.

2) Don’t abandon the investment ship: Market downturns are always filled with panic selling – and buying. While times are tough, it’s wise to examine all your investment choices, but if they make sense, definitely put what you can afford in. You’ll reap rewards when the market returns.

3) Check with your banks: As a result of federal economic bailout legislation, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) temporarily raised the per-deposit account, per bank coverage level from $100,000 to $250,000 through Dec. 31, 2009. Certain retirement-related accounts carry $250,000 of FDIC coverage, but again, check in with your bank to make sure you’re covered, and if not, get the right advice for moving funds so you don’t incur an unexpected tax liability or fees.

4) Cash is king: Historically having three to six months of cash on hand in case of emergency was sufficient. These days you may want to consider having twelve months of cash on hand, so that you will not need to tap your investments for expenses in case your job situation changes.

5) Check your credit: No one knows how long it might take to unravel the nation’s current credit situation. That’s why creditworthy individuals might want to delay looking for new lines of credit until things loosen, and it’s definitely a good time to schedule review of each of your latest credit reports at staggered intervals throughout the next year. Why? Because in tough economies and times of tight credit, identity theft might be on the rise, and you’ll need to make sure the information on your credit data is truly your own.

6) Revisit your budget: It’s a good time to make a budget or re-assess the one you have. Though the federal government would love for consumers to start spending again to lift the economy, that doesn’t mean you have to jump in with both feet. Keep your spending smart, your debt low so it’s easier to set savings and investment priorities that will do you the most good when the economy and the market come back.

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