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Infant Language Development Omaha NE

Television reduces verbal interaction between parents and infants, which could delay children's language development, says a U.S. study that challenges claims that certain infant-targeted DVDs actually benefit youngsters.

John Norman Walburn, MD
(402) 559-7346
982167 Nebraska Medical Ctr
Omaha, NE
Specialties
Pediatrics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ne Coll Of Med, Omaha Ne 68198
Graduation Year: 1973

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Yohanna Sachiko Vernon
(402) 708-2176
982185 Nebraska Medical Ctr
Omaha, NE
Specialty
Pediatrics

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Garth Easton Fletcher, MD
(402) 559-6750
PO Box 981205,
Omaha, NE
Specialties
Pediatrics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Creighton Univ Sch Of Med, Omaha Ne 68178
Graduation Year: 1986

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Paul Henry Sammut, MD
(402) 559-5326
985190 Nebraska Medical Ctr
Omaha, NE
Specialties
Pediatrics, Pediatric Pulmonology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Coll Of Galway, Nat'L Univ Of Ireland, Fac Of Med, Galway
Graduation Year: 1981

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Nicole D Birge
(402) 559-5380
982185 Nebraska Medical Ctr
Omaha, NE
Specialty
Pediatrics

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Debra Karla Whaley
(402) 559-5380
982185 Nebraska Medical Ctr
Omaha, NE
Specialty
Pediatrics

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Amy Salem Lacroix, MD
(402) 559-7849
982167 Nebraska Medical Ctr
Omaha, NE
Specialties
Pediatrics
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ne Coll Of Med, Omaha Ne 68198
Graduation Year: 1991

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John L Colombo, MD
(402) 559-6275
600 S 42nd St
Omaha, NE
Specialties
Pediatrics, Pediatric Pulmonology
Gender
Male
Languages
Other
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ne Coll Of Med, Omaha Ne 68198
Graduation Year: 1975
Hospital
Hospital: Childrens Mem Hosp, Omaha, Ne; University Health Center, Lincoln, Ne
Group Practice: University Medical Associates Univ Of Nebraska Medical Ctr

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Jeffrey Dean Kingsley, MD
(402) 559-8883
982162 Nebraska Med Ctr,
Omaha, NE
Specialties
Pediatrics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Creighton Univ Sch Of Med, Omaha Ne 68178
Graduation Year: 2000

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Sharon R Stoolman
(402) 559-9800
988095 Nebraska Medical Ctr
Omaha, NE
Specialty
Pediatrics

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Infant Language Development

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THURSDAY, June 4 (HealthDay News) -- Television reduces verbal interaction between parents and infants, which could delay children's language development, says a U.S. study that challenges claims that certain infant-targeted DVDs actually benefit youngsters.

The researchers studied 329 children, aged 2 months to 48 months, and found that for each additional hour of television exposure, there was a decrease of 770 words (7 percent) heard from an adult by the children. The study also found that the more hours spent watching television, the fewer vocalizations infants made when adults talked to them.

"Some of these reductions are likely due to children being left alone in front of the television screen, but others likely reflect situations in which adults, though present, are distracted by the screen and not interacting with their infant in a discernable manner," wrote Dr. Dimitri A. Christakis, of Seattle Children's Hospital, and colleagues.

"At first blush, these findings may seem entirely intuitive. However, these findings must be interpreted in light of the fact that purveyors of infant DVDs claim that their products are designed to give parents and children a chance to interact with one another, an assertion that lacks empirical evidence," they noted.

The researchers added that their results may help explain previous findings of a link between television viewing and delayed language development.

"Given the critical role that adult caregivers play in children's linguistic development, whether they talk to their child while the screen is on may be critical and explain the effects that are attributed to content or even amount of television watched," the team wrote. "That is, whether parents talk less (or not at all) during some types of programs or at some times of the day may be as important in this age group as what is being watched."

The study appears in the June issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders outlines speech and language milestones.

SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, June 1, 2009

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