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Kidney Transplant Omaha NE

Chronic kidney disease can contribute to the development of heart disease, which means that doctors need to closely monitor the heart health of chronic kidney patients. But many doctors are reluctant to use coronary angiography -- which uses dyes and X-rays to provide an image of the inside of the heart's arteries -- on people with chronic kidney disease because of fears that the procedure raises the risk for complications.

Helen Bergado Lovell, MD
(402) 559-7344
982169 Nebraska Medical Ctr
Omaha, NE
Specialties
Pediatrics, Pediatric Nephrology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ca, San Francisco, Sch Of Med, San Francisco Ca 94143
Graduation Year: 1976

Data Provided by:
Pascale Hammond Lane, MD
(402) 559-7344
600 S 42nd St
Omaha, NE
Specialties
Pediatrics, Pediatric Nephrology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mo-Kansas City Sch Of Med, Kansas City Mo 64108
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided by:
Vinaya Rao, MD
Emile @ 42nd Street,
Omaha, NE
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nephrology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Bangalore Med Coll, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided by:
Jeffrey Alan Passer, MD
(402) 398-1200
9300 Underwood Ave
Omaha, NE
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nephrology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ne Coll Of Med, Omaha Ne 68198
Graduation Year: 1972
Hospital
Hospital: Nebraska Methodist Hospital, Omaha, Ne
Group Practice: Nature's Key Weight Loss Ctr

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Tomas Andres Neumann, MD
(402) 398-6700
7710 Mercy Rd Ste 509
Omaha, NE
Specialties
Nephrology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Languages
English, German, Spanish
Education
Medical School: Univ De Buenos Aires, Fac De Med, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Graduation Year: 1972

Data Provided by:
Vinaya Rao, MD
(402) 559-9227
983040 Nebraska Medical Ctr
Omaha, NE
Specialties
Nephrology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Bangalore Med Coll, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided by:
Troy Plumb, MD
(402) 559-9227
983040 Nebraska Medical Ctr
Omaha, NE
Specialties
Nephrology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Gerald Clare Groggel, MD
(402) 559-9227
983040 Nebraska Medical Ctr
Omaha, NE
Specialties
Nephrology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided by:
Brian Poole, MD
(303) 315-5102
726 N 57th Ave
Omaha, NE
Specialties
Nephrology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Jerry L Fischer
(402) 398-6700
7710 Mercy Rd
Omaha, NE
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Nephrology

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Kidney Transplant

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THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- A test to determine whether a person's heart is healthy enough for a kidney transplant is safer than previously thought, according to a British study.

Chronic kidney disease can contribute to the development of heart disease, which means that doctors need to closely monitor the heart health of chronic kidney patients. But many doctors are reluctant to use coronary angiography -- which uses dyes and X-rays to provide an image of the inside of the heart's arteries -- on people with chronic kidney disease because of fears that the procedure raises the risk for complications.

But the study found that coronary angiography does not cause a decline in kidney function in people with advanced chronic disease and can help doctors decide when to schedule someone for a kidney transplant, said Dr. Nicky Kumar, of the Imperial College Kidney and Transplant Institute in London, and colleagues.

They looked at 76 people with late-stage chronic kidney disease who were potential transplant recipients. Kidney function tests were recorded a year before and a year after they had coronary angiography. Kidney function was similar before and after the procedure, indicating that it didn't harm the kidneys.

Coronary angiography detected coronary artery disease in 23 people, which meant they couldn't have a kidney transplant until their heart problems were treated. The heart testing showed that 22 of them were healthy enough to have a kidney transplant instead of going on dialysis.

The researchers said this kind of heart health information is essential for optimal care because having a kidney transplant before someone needs dialysis is the most effective treatment for chronic kidney disease.

The study was published online Oct. 15 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about chronic kidney disease.

SOURCE: American Society of Nephrology, news release, Oct. 15, 2009

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