Mast Climber Safety Omaha NE

Mast climbing work platforms (MCWPs) are the preferred method of access in a number of trades in Omaha, with masonry being one of the most significant. MCWPs consist of a horizontal platform driven up and down on a vertical mast by electric or gasoline motors using rack and pinion technology or hydraulic cylinders for lifting.

Our Tech Solutions
(402) 778-7999
1010 N 96th St
Omaha, NE
 
Aksarben TV & Digital Services
(402) 572-8010
3021 N 93 St
Omaha, NE
 
Friendly Computers Mobile Computer Services
(402) 965-3300
5069 S. 108th St
Omaha, NE
 
Dan the Computer Man
(402) 939-8555
Irvington-Northwest
Omaha, NE
Hours
M-Sa 7:00am - 8:00pm

Data Provided by:
Friendly Computers Mobile Computer Services
(402) 965-3300
5069 S. 108th St
Omaha, NE
 
Geeks
(402) 933-4357
8218 F Street
Omaha, NE
 
Innovation5 Technologies
(402) 403-4199
11414 W. Center Rd
Omaha, NE
 
Accounting Solutions & Resources
(402) 537-9800
7561 Main St
Omaha, NE
 
Baldwin Technical Services
(402) 504-6441
156th & Harrison
Omaha, NE
 
Computer Hardware Inc
(402) 483-6400
237 S 70th St
Lincoln, NE
 
Data Provided by:

Mast Climber Safety

Provided By:

Source: MASONRY CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE
Publication date: March 1, 2009

By MASONRY CONSTRUCTION Staff

Mast climbing work platforms (MCWPs) are the preferred method of access in a number of trades, with masonry being one of the most significant. MCWPs consist of a horizontal platform driven up and down on a vertical mast by electric or gasoline motors using rack and pinion technology or hydraulic cylinders for lifting.

One mast can raise platforms up to 60 feet long to heights of several hundred feet. Heavy loads (up to 10,000-pound capacity) are lifted on a single stable, spacious working platform. People and materials are delivered to the exact point on the façade where needed at the touch of a button. For these reasons, mason contractors have been increasingly using mast climbers to provide enormous increases in their productivity, while lowering costs.

Mast climbers are flexible, economical, productive, and intrinsically safer than most scaffolding systems. With the combination of these factors, plus their stability at height, users are quickly realizing the benefits of these systems and becoming comfortable working on them. While use continues to grow in the U.S., guidance on the safe operation of the product has not matched the pace of development.

Leading the effort

The International Powered Access Federation (IPAF) is leading a drive for higher standards of use, training, and assessment of these systems.

Click here to read full article from Masonry Construction