Obesity and Severe Complications from the H1N1 Virus Lincoln NE

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William Michael Johnson, MD
(402) 484-6995
6400 Monticello Dr
Lincoln, NE
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Critical Care Medicine, Sleep Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ne Coll Of Med, Omaha Ne 68198
Graduation Year: 1990

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Dr.Lisa Mansur
(402) 483-8600
1500 S 48th St # 800
Lincoln, NE
Gender
F
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1990
Speciality
Pulmonologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
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1.5, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

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Dr.John Rudersdorf
(402) 483-8600
1500 S 48th St # 800
Lincoln, NE
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Creighton Univ Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1974
Speciality
Pulmonologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

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John Francis Trapp, MD
(402) 483-1919
1500 S 48th St Ste 605
Lincoln, NE
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Critical Care Medicine, Sleep Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: St Louis Univ Sch Of Med, St Louis Mo 63104
Graduation Year: 1991
Hospital
Hospital: Bryan Mem Hosp, Lincoln, Ne; St Francis Med Ctr, Grand Island, Ne
Group Practice: Pulmonary Specialties

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Bob J Bleicher
(402) 474-3704
2222 S 16th St
Lincoln, NE
Specialty
Pulmonary Disease

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Bob J Bleicher, MD
(402) 483-1919
1500 S 48th St Ste 605
Lincoln, NE
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Diseases
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ia Coll Of Med, Iowa City Ia 52242
Graduation Year: 1978

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Kevin J Reichmuth
(402) 483-8600
1500 S 48th St
Lincoln, NE
Specialty
Pulmonary Disease

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Ellen G Miller
(402) 483-8600
1500 S 48th St
Lincoln, NE
Specialty
Pulmonary Critical Care, Sleep Medicine

Data Provided by:
Timothy Richard Lieske
(402) 474-3704
2222 S 16th St
Lincoln, NE
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care (Intensivists)

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Jason Bradley Wittmer, MD
(402) 474-3704
2222 S 16th St Ste B-400
Lincoln, NE
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Critical Care Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 1997

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Obesity and Severe Complications from the H1N1 Virus

Obesity and Severe Complications from the H1N1 Virus.
Date: Monday, October 05, 2009
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
Related Monographs: Obesity, Weight Loss, Colds and Flu
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Obesity is defined as weight that exceeds 15 percent of normal weight for height and body type. Morbid obesity exceeds 20 percent of optimum weight. Obesity is considered a disease state. Life expectancy may be decreased in overweight and obese individuals. An obese person is at high risk for developing a number of complications, including heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, varicose veins, psychological stress, osteoarthritis, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes. However, weight is not the only factor in the development of disease. Body composition, the measurement of body fat and lean muscle mass, is now recognized as an important determinant of health. Body fat has important functions, including providing readily accessible energy during short periods of fasting. Fat is a structural component of organs, the nervous system, and skeletal muscles.

Obesity is a continually growing problem in most industrial nations. Obesity is also difficult to diagnose due to the lack of any specific, definite definition of the disorder. The body mass index (BMI) is a widely used formula to calculate obesity because body fat is considered within the calculated result. To calculate body mass index for a given height and weight, use the following formula: BMI = weight in kilograms (pounds divided by 2.2) divided by the square of the height in meters (inches divided by 39.4). Guidelines created in 1998 state that the BMI must be 24 or less in order for one's weight to be considered healthy. An individual with a BMI 25 to 29.9 is considered overweight. Obese individuals have a BMI greater than 30. Body mass index is associated with overall mortality. Studies have indicated that the greater the BMI in the individual, the greater the risk of death from all causes. Smoking and the presence of heart disease, cancer, or other disease increases the risk of death even more in both men and women.

A new influenza A (H1N1) virus (also known as the swine flu) has never before circulated among humans. This virus is not related to previous or current human seasonal influenza viruses. The virus is spread from person-to-person. It is transmitted as easily as the normal seasonal flu and can be passed to other people by exposure to infected droplets expelled by coughing or sneezing that can be inhaled, or that can contaminate hands or surfaces.

Signs of influenza A (H1N1) are flu-like, including fever, cough, headache, muscle and joint pain, sore throat and runny nose, and sometimes vomiting and diarrhea. Most of the people who contract the virus experience the milder disease and recover without antiviral treatment or medical care. Of the more serious cases, more than half of hospitalized people had underlying health conditions or weak immune systems. There is a vaccine available right now to protect against the novel H1N1 virus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is emphasizing that health workers, pregnant women, children and people with special health conditions including heart disease and diabetes should be the first ones to get the vaccine. As always, a vaccine will be available to protect against seasonal influenza.

Recent research appears to show that obesity plays a role in potential risk for severe complications from the H1N1 virus. From April 26 through June 18, 2009, community-wide transmission of H1N1 virus occurred in Michigan with 655 probable and confirmed cases. Researchers then reported the clinical characteristics of a series of 10 patients with H1N1 who were hospitalized and in the intensive care unit (ICU). Of the 10 patients, nine were found to be obese with a BMI equal or greater than 30. Seven of those patients were deemed to be extremely obese with a BMI over 40. Of the 10 patients, three died from complications of the H1N1 flu. This data shows that doctors should be aware of severe complications from H1N1 flu virus especially in extremely obese patients.1

1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Intensive-care patients with severe novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection - Michigan, June 2009. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2009;58(27):749-52.

This information is educational in context and is not to be used to diagnose, treat or cure any disease. Please consult your licensed health care practitioner before using this or any medical information.
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