Pregnancy and Seafood Intake Lincoln NE

Read more about Depressive Symptoms During Pregnancy Linked to Low Intake of Fish.

Red Lobster
(402) 466-8397
6540 O Street
Lincoln, NE
Cuisine Type
Seafood
Price Range
$10 - $20, More than $20
Service Type
delivery, catering

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Kentucky Fried Chicken - Long John Silvers
(402) 465-8803
2221 N 86th St
Lincoln, NE

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Red Lobster
(308) 237-5805
121 Second Avenue East
Kearney, NE
Cuisine Type
Seafood
Price Range
$10 - $20, More than $20
Service Type
delivery, catering

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Red Lobster
(308) 382-8879
3430 W 13Th Street
Grand Island, NE
Cuisine Type
Seafood
Price Range
$10 - $20, More than $20
Service Type
delivery, catering

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Red Lobster
(402) 391-5970
330 S. 72Nd Street
Omaha, NE
Cuisine Type
Seafood
Price Range
$10 - $20, More than $20
Service Type
delivery, catering

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Crabby's Seafood & Steakhouse
(402) 435-3888
803 Q St
Lincoln, NE

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Red Lobster
(402) 466-8397
6540 O Street
Lincoln, NE
Cuisine Type
Seafood
Price Range
$10 - $20, More than $20
Service Type
delivery, catering

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Red Lobster
(402) 330-0162
2707 S. 140Th Street
Omaha, NE
Cuisine Type
Seafood
Price Range
$10 - $20, More than $20
Service Type
delivery, catering

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Hooters
(402) 333-4087
12405 W Center Rd
Omaha, NE
Cuisine Type
Seafood, American/Family, Sports Bars/Pubs, Soup/Salad
Price Range
$10 - $20
Service Type
takeout, catering

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Surfside Club
(402) 451-9642
14445 N River Dr
Omaha, NE

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Pregnancy and Seafood Intake

Depressive Symptoms During Pregnancy Linked to Low Intake of Fish.
Date: Wednesday, August 05, 2009
Source: Epidemiology
Related Monographs: Fish Oil, Omega-3 Fatty Acids
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Pregnancy is the carrying of one or more offspring, known as a fetus or embryo, inside the uterus of a female. Pregnancy occurs as the result of the female gamete or oocyte merging with the male gamete, spermatozoon, in a process referred to, in medicine, as "fertilization," or more commonly known as "conception." After the point of "fertilization," it is referred to as an egg. The fusion of male and female gametes usually occurs through the act of sexual intercourse, resulting in spontaneous pregnancy. However, the advent of artificial insemination and in vitro fertilization have also made achieving pregnancy possible in cases where sexual intercourse does not result in fertilization (e.g., through choice or male/female infertility). Childbirth usually occurs about 38 weeks after conception; i.e., approximately 40 weeks from the last normal menstrual period (LNMP) in humans. The World Health Organization defines normal term for delivery as between 37 weeks and 42 weeks. The calculation of this date involves the assumption of a regular 28-day period.

Omega-3 is an essential fatty acid that is deficient in the diets of many Americans. In the late 1970s, scientists learned that the native Inuits in Greenland, who consumed a diet very high in omega-3 fatty acids, had surprisingly low rates of heart attacks. Since that time, more than 4,500 studies have been conducted in an attempt to understand the beneficial roles that the omega-3 fatty acids play in human metabolism and health. Structurally, omega-3 contains 3 double bonds, which makes it a polyunsaturated fatty acid. This also makes omega-3 very susceptible to becoming rancid. Food processors remove it from food products in order to lengthen shelf life. Marine plants such as plankton are the primary source of omega-3 fatty acids in the food chain. Fish and other aquatic animals that feed on plankton, incorporate the omega-3 fatty acids into their tissues. The richest land source of omega-3 is the oil that is commercially expelled from flaxseeds. Alpha-linolenic acid gets converted in the body into longer-chain omega-3 fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Thus, the term omega-3 also refers to a family of omega-3 fatty acids, which includes alpha-linolenic acid, EPA, and DHA.

Fish oil contains both eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Both of these are members of omega-3 family of fatty acids and are different from the omega-3 fatty acids found in oils from vegetable sources.

A recent study tested the hypothesis that low seafood intake during pregnancy is associated with an increase in depressive symptoms. The study included 9,960 pregnant women. The women completed a questionnaire that included symptoms of depression and a food frequency questionnaire from which the amount of omega-3 fatty acids consumed from fish was calculated. The results revealed that compared with pregnant women who ate 3 or more servings of seafood per week (the equivalent of more than 1.5 grams of omega-3 fatty acids) those who ate no seafood were about 50 percent more likely to report symptoms of depression at 32 weeks of pregnancy. This association between low intake of seafood and high prevalence of depressive symptoms remained significant even when researchers accounted for a variety of factors that might influence the results. The data collected from this study is important because recent recommendations have indicated that pregnant women should limit some of their seafood intake due to its mercury content, but it appears this advice may lead to a greater increase in depressive symptoms among pregnant women.1

1 Golding J, Steer C, Emmett P, et al.  High Levels of Depressive Symptoms in Pregnancy With Low Omega-3 Fatty Acid Intake From Fish. Epidemiology. Jul2009;20(4):598-603.

This information is educational in context and is not to be used to diagnose, treat or cure any disease. Please consult your licensed health care practitioner before using this or any medical information.
©2000-2009 CCG, Inc. All Rights Reserved.