Special Education Discipline Lincoln NE

There are many cases when children who receive special education are put in the same environment as children with no disabilities. In fact, nowadays, it’s common for these kids to be called “differently-abled” and not quite politically correct to refer to them as “disabled”.

Soa Yuc Lee
(402) 489-3802
600 S 70th St
Lincoln, NE
Specialty
Psychiatry

Data Provided by:
Walter J Duffy
(402) 476-6060
8101 O St
Lincoln, NE
Specialty
Psychiatry, Child Psychiatry

Data Provided by:
Thomas J. Gilligan
(402) 488-1032
InSight
Lincoln, NE
Services
Individual Psychotherapy, Psychological Assessment
Education Info
Doctoral Program: United States International University
Credentialed Since: 1975-02-28

Data Provided by:
Kimberly Andrews Espy
(402) 472-2851
Univ. of Nebraska-Lincoln, Office of Research
Lincoln, NE
Services
Clinical Neuropsychological Assessment, Behavioral Health Intervention involving Medical Conditions/Disorder, Disorder Diagnosed in Infancy-Adolescence (e.g., ADHD, LD, MR, or Pervasive Devel Disorder), Psychological Assessment
Ages Served
Children (3-12 yrs.)
Infants (0-2 yrs.)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Houston
Credentialed Since: 2002-03-25

Data Provided by:
Dose Kyla Lmhp
(402) 570-1244
315 S 9th St Ste 200
Lincoln, NE
Industry
Mental Health Professional

Data Provided by:
Swagger Scott Ms Lmhp
(402) 484-8898
211 S 84th St
Lincoln, NE
Industry
Mental Health Professional

Data Provided by:
Meyer-Krikac Kolleen R Ms Lmhp
(402) 488-6120
7121 A St
Lincoln, NE
Industry
Mental Health Professional, Psychologist

Data Provided by:
Cynthia L Pilkington
(402) 376-6060
8101 O St, Ste 300
Lincoln, NE
Services
Individual Psychotherapy, Play Therapy, Psychological Assessment
Ages Served
Children (3-12 yrs.)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Infants (0-2 yrs.)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Nebraska - Lincoln
Credentialed Since: 1991-02-19

Data Provided by:
Meyerle Susan D Lmhp
(402) 476-6060
8101 O St
Lincoln, NE
Industry
Mental Health Professional, Registered Nurse

Data Provided by:
Pathfinder Support Services Inc
(402) 325-0055
1620 N St
Lincoln, NE
Industry
Mental Health Professional

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Special Education Discipline

There are many cases when children who receive special education are put in the same environment as children with no disabilities. In fact, nowadays, it’s common for these kids to be called “differently-abled” and not quite politically correct to refer to them as “disabled”. However, for the purposes of this article, differently-abled children who receive sped will still be referred to as disabled.

It’s also one thing for the disability to be something physical, and another when the disability involves mental development. Discipline in special education then becomes a very controversial topic. Needless to say, discipline under these circumstances would need special teaching skills on the part of the school so that the child’s condition won’t interfere with his/her own learning and the learning process of his/her classmates. Below are teaching tips for teachers who are faced with this problem.

    1. Look at the federal school laws and read them closely with special education laws. As a teacher, you are put at a position where you cannot favor the welfare of any child over the other. You can’t set parameters in your classroom just because this can make teaching easier for you. In other words, unless the disruption in the classroom is caused specifically by the special child’s disability, you cannot make ways for him/her to be placed in a different learning space. Remember, the objective here is to help these children adapt to the real world. If you take the easy road out, you might be accused of discriminating the student. However, if you think that the condition cannot be handled reasonably inside your classroom, and the child is not yet prepared for the classroom set up you may request for the child to be relocated. You need to be very careful when you do this, of course. Unless the board has seen you put an ample amount of effort into helping the child adapt to your class, this will reflect badly on your records.

    2. Instead of punishing the child outright because of a misbehavior, you should find out the cause of the misbehavior. Children who may have disabilities tend to look at the world differently, and what you may perceive as a “misbehavior” may very well be a reaction to an illogical fear. For example, when a child constantly walks out of the classroom, this can be because s/he is expressing impatience because s/he missed a turn, or anxiety because s/he got too excited about the recitation. While this may seem rude for you and laughable for the rest of the class, you have to remind yourself that the child needs “special attention” and ergo, understanding from you. Observe this behavior and try to find out the reasons behind it without losing your composure in class. Once you’ve figured out what the cause may be, try to avoid the situation. Another option is to talk to the child, and teach him/her a positive behavior to replace this negative habit. This will take time, but positive reinforcements always work better than punishments. Whenever the child behaves well in class, you should show your appreciation by rewarding him/her.

    3. The reason why special children are brought into the classroom set up is to avoid sheltering them too much from the real world. We have to face the fact that just because we can protect them now, we can’t always protect them forever. The sad fact is that these children need special understanding from their peers. Unfortunately, they are made fun of, and most of the time, even antagonized by most people who don’t understand. Therefore, this no longer just concerns giving special education to disabled kids. It’s also a matter of building a society where these disabled kids are understood by their peers. As a teacher, you are responsible for breeding certain “cultures” in your classroom. For this reason, before you even let a special child into your class, you should prepare all of your other students. This can be a huge challenge because this will involve them unlearning a lot of negative perception about special children. They may have learned this at home, and this doesn’t mean that their parents were particularly bad parents. It’s just that this “misunderstanding” was culturally passed on from one generation to the next, and deep inside you, you know that you were also unconsciously brought up to perceive special children this way. To prepare your class for the program, you should talk to them and make them understand that their new classmates survival in the real world will all depend on how they help him/her learn as well. Again, instead of working up the children’s fears, apply positive reinforcements. Appeal to their emotions, and make them see how important it is for them to act as “guides” to your disabled student. Of course, one or two may still try to bully the child. This is normal even for children with no disabilities. But you should try to win over at least the greater majority of the classroom. Sharing stories and making them watch movies regarding the struggles of a special child are good techniques to make them understand the situation better.

    4. The children are not the only ones who should be supporting the teacher in this endeavor. Most of the time, parents also come into the picture, and volunteers even act as teacher aids when the situation calls for it. This usually happens when the age bracket of the entire class is very young. Letting children who are still in their formative years understand the situation may be quite a problem, and sometimes the setting invites fights. This can be a very difficult situation to handle, especially in terms of disciplining both the special child and the able-child. Under the Federal Law, the discipline methods for both children should be the same unless the incident was caused by the special child’s condition. This can be a very tricky case to solve, and most of the time, it even involves a hearing. In events where any of the children were seriously injured, this can mean suspension or expulsion for one or both of the children, and will have to be decided by the court. Hopefully, any violent circumstances may be avoided if the parents were also involved in the program. This way, the learning (both of the special child and the other children) will not stop in the classroom. They will be trained to support one another even when they’re at home as well.